CSL Daily

Posted by on Sep 28, 2016

FACT OF THE DAY: The September 1946 issue of The Atlantic Monthly featured an article called “C.S. Lewis, Apostle to the Skeptics” by Chad Walsh. – – – QUOTE OF THE DAY: “[Christianity] was never intended to replace or supersede the ordinary human arts and sciences: it is rather a director which will set them all to […]

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Special Feature

Posted by on Sep 26, 2016

The following is a plenary talk from the Inklings Fellowship’s An Inklings Week in Oxford. This one is by Dr. Don King. His title was “Warnie Lewis and WWI.” It was given at St. Giles Church on Friday, July 22, 2016. Please note that the video was NOT professionally recorded. It was done by me using […]

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All About Jack

Posted by on Sep 24, 2016

This book interview is from 2012, but it had not yet been featured here since changing the podcast audio hosting. It is a conversation with Dr. Charlie W. Starr and his book Light: C.S. Lewis’s First and Final Short Story. It tells the story of how a manuscript surfaced that appeared to be a different version of […]

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Confirming Quotations

Posted by on Sep 6, 2016

This is part of a series exploring quotations attributed to C.S. Lewis that are questionable for one reason or another. Presently a new article is posted the first Saturday of each month. There is an “at a glance” page HERE to quickly see what has been posted so far in this series. Also, if you haven’t […]

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Recent Posts

Confirming C.S. Lewis Quotations (INTRODUCTION)

This is the official introduction to an occasional series exploring quotations attributed to C.S. Lewis that are questionable for one reason or another. There is an “at a glance” page HERE to quickly see what has been posted so far in this series. 

INTRODUCTION

Why Care?

The first thought some people have when they hear a quotations attributed to C.S. Lewis may not be by him, or that the quote as it is presented is too isolated from its context, is WHO CARES? Obviously, I do and in addition to many other that I know do, I hope you will as well.

Categories of Questionable Quotations

To make sure you are clear with what these mean, the following explanations should help:

  1. Not – those falsely attributed to Lewis. Someone else wrote it. Lewis may or may not have written something similar.

  2. Almost – it is either a paraphrase or missing some words or incorrect words, but usually no one else said it as far as we know.

  3. Not Quite – while Lewis wrote it, the quote when isolated means something other than intended (or has the potential to be misunderstood).

WELCOME!

WELCOME!
Sketch courtesy of Jef Murray

Sketch courtesy of Jef Murray

The purpose of Essential C.S. Lewis is to provide useful information to all types of C.S. Lewis fans. So, whether you are new to the works and writings of C.S. Lewis, or have been reading him for years, you should be able to find something new and/or interesting. Something just begun in 2013 are two new features. Below you will notice Jack in Retrospect and Quote of the Day. The first is a weekly column examining what was going on related to Lewis over the years that week. The quotes shared are from something he wrote (or was published) around the same time or month.  The four remaining elements: C.S. Lewis MinuteAll About Jack PodcastLewis Daily Quiz and Fact of the Day are the same as before (click on the links for details if you need it). Something else new is the ability to keep up with this site via Facebook. Please visit and like!

CSL Daily 9/28

q9-28

FACT OF THE DAY:

The September 1946 issue of The Atlantic Monthly featured an article called “C.S. Lewis, Apostle to the Skeptics” by Chad Walsh.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“[Christianity] was never intended to replace or supersede the ordinary human arts and sciences: it is rather a director which will set them all to the right jobs, and a source of energy which will give them all new life, if only they will put themselves at its disposal.”

Social Morality
(Broadcast on BBC on 9/27/1942; Chapter two from Book Three, Christian Behaviour in Mere Christianity)

CSL Daily 9/27

q9-27

FACT OF THE DAY:

The 2nd talk in the third BBC series (Christian Behaviour) was broadcast today (Sept. 27) in 1942. Published it was called “Social Morality.”

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“Really great moral teachers never do introduce new moralities: it is quacks and cranks who do that.”

Social Morality
(Broadcast on BBC on 9/27/1942; Chapter two from Book Three, Christian Behaviour in Mere Christianity)

(Video) Dr. Don King – “Warnie Lewis and WWI”

The following is a plenary talk from the Inklings Fellowship’s An Inklings Week in Oxford. This one is by Dr. Don King. His title was “Warnie Lewis and WWI.” It was given at St. Giles Church on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Please note that the video was NOT professionally recorded. It was done by me using my Galaxy Note 4 phone  and was one of the first attempts to record a lecture. While the video itself is clear, the audio did not turn out as well as hoped.

CSL Daily 9/26

q9-26

FACT OF THE DAY:

The 22nd Screwtape letter was published today (Sept. 26) in 1941 in The Guardian (before being release in 1942 as a single book). It’s the only one signed by Toadpipe.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“Everything has to be twisted before it’s any use to us.”

The Screwtape Letters – XXII
(First published in The Guardian on 9/26/1941)

CSL Daily 9/25

q9-25

FACT OF THE DAY:

Today (Sept. 25)  in 1929 Lewis’s father (Albert) died. His financial support was vital to Lewis getting his degrees at Oxford.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“Men are not angered by mere misfortune but by misfortune conceived as injury.”

The Screwtape Letters – XXI
(First published in The Guardian on 9/19/1941)

Light: C.S. Lewis’s First and Final Short Story (Dr. Charlie Starr)

Light (Lewis Final Short Story)This book interview is from 2012, but it had not yet been featured here since changing the podcast audio hosting. It is a conversation with Dr. Charlie W. Starr and his book Light: C.S. Lewis’s First and Final Short Story. It tells the story of how a manuscript surfaced that appeared to be a different version of a short story called “The Man Born Blind.” The book reveals the results of his investigation and includes several interpretations of “Light.” The interview was recorded at the 2012 C.S. Lewis Colloquium at Taylor University. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Listen to “Light: C.S. Lewis’s First and Final Short Story”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CSL Daily 9/24

q9-24

FACT OF THE DAY:

On September 12, 1951 “The Country of the Blind” is a poem first published in Punch and available in Poems.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“A pleasure is full grown only when it is remembered.”

Out of the Silent Planet
(Published 9/23/1938)

CSL Daily 9/23

q9-23

FACT OF THE DAY:

Out of the Silent Planet was first published on this day (9/23) in 1938. It was his second fictional story for Lewis as a Christian.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“Every day in a life fills the whole life with expectation and memory.”

Out of the Silent Planet
(Published 9/23/1938)

CSL Daily 9/22

q9-22

FACT OF THE DAY:

On this day (Sept. 22) in 1944 “The Death of Words” was published in The Spectator. It was republished in On Stories.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“The most important sense of a word is not always the most useful. What is the good of deepening a word’s connotation if you deprive the word of all practicable denotation?”

The Death of Words
(Published 9/22/1944 in The Spectator)

CSL Daily 9/21

q9-21

FACT OF THE DAY:

“The Sermon and the Lunch” was first published on this date (Sept. 21) in 1945 in Church of England Newspaper. It’s now in God in the Dock.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“The greed to be loved is a fearful thing. Some of those who say (and almost with pride) that they live only for love come, at last, to live in incessant resentment.”

The Sermon and the Lunch
(Published 9/21/1945 in Church of England Newspaper)

CSL Daily 9/20

q9-20

FACT OF THE DAY:

Christian Behaviour, the third BBC series for Lewis began on this day (Sept. 20) in 1942. The first talk was “The Three Parts of Morality.”

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“Think of humanity as a band playing a tune. To get a good result, you need two things . Each player’s individual instrument must be in tune and also each must come in at the right moment so as to combine with all the others.”

The Three Parts of Morality
(Broadcast on BBC on 9/20/1942; Chapter one from Book Three, Christian Behaviour in Mere Christianity)

CSL Daily 9/19

q9-19

FACT OF THE DAY:

Surprised By Joy: The Shape of My Early Life by Lewis was published today (Sept. 19) in 1955.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“Joy is not a substitute for sex; sex is very often a substitute for Joy. I sometimes wonder whether all pleasures are not substitutes for Joy.”

Surprised By Joy
(Published 9/19/1955)

CSL Daily 9/18

q9-18

FACT OF THE DAY:

“The Landing” is a poem published in Punch on Sept. 15, 1948; a revised version is in Poems.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“The limit of giving is to be the limit of our ability to give.”

English Literature in the Sixteenth Century
(Published 9/16/1954)

CSL Daily 9/17

q9-17

FACT OF THE DAY:

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe began being dramatized on the BBC in six weekly installments on this date (Sept. 18) in 1959.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“The value given to the testimony of any feeling must depend on our philosophy [belief system], not our whole philosophy on a feeling.”

Religion: Reality or Substitute?
(Published in September-October, 1941 issue of World Dominion)

CSL Daily 9/16

q9-16

FACT OF THE DAY:

English Literature in the Sixteenth Century, Excluding Drama by Lewis was published today (Sept. 16) in 1954. (It was nearly 30 years in the making).

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“The rule of decorum exists to avoid clashes or shocks to organized sensibility: but it was an early discovery that an occasional defiance of the rule, resulting in a shock, can give pleasure; a pleasure rich in tragic or comic possibilities. Indeed one of the purposes for which the rule exists is that it may sometimes be broken.”

English Literature in the Sixteenth Century
(Published 9/16/1954)