CSL Daily

Posted by on Jul 29, 2016

FACT OF THE DAY: Quam Bene Saturno, Lewis’s first published poem came out in July, 1913 (when he was just 14). It was in Cherbourg School Magazine. – – – QUOTE OF THE DAY: “We must, on pain of idiocy, deny from the very outset the idea that looking at is, by its own nature, […]

Read More

Special Feature

Posted by on Jul 26, 2016

While in Oxford last week I visited the famous Addison’s Walk. It is on the grounds at Magdalen, where Lewis taught for nearly 30 years. I was there attending the Inklings Week that the Inklings Fellowship organized. Dr. Don King was doing an informal tour of Magdalen and when we arrived at the place where […]

Read More

All About Jack

Posted by on Jul 27, 2016

The following is the complete interview (nearly 60 minutes) with Walter Hooper. It was recording in his home on July 20, 2016. As you likely know, Walter has been the central figure since the death of C.S. Lewis in making sure Lewis’ writing that were published in his life were reprinted and also Hooper has […]

Read More

Confirming Quotations

Posted by on Jul 9, 2016

This is part of a series exploring quotations attributed to C.S. Lewis that are questionable for one reason or another. Presently a new article is posted the first Saturday of each month. There is an “at a glance” page HERE to quickly see what has been posted so far in this series. Also, if you haven’t […]

Read More

Recent Posts

Confirming C.S. Lewis Quotations (INTRODUCTION)

This is the official introduction to an occasional series exploring quotations attributed to C.S. Lewis that are questionable for one reason or another. There is an “at a glance” page HERE to quickly see what has been posted so far in this series. 

INTRODUCTION

Why Care?

The first thought some people have when they hear a quotations attributed to C.S. Lewis may not be by him, or that the quote as it is presented is too isolated from its context, is WHO CARES? Obviously, I do and in addition to many other that I know do, I hope you will as well.

Categories of Questionable Quotations

To make sure you are clear with what these mean, the following explanations should help:

  1. Not – those falsely attributed to Lewis. Someone else wrote it. Lewis may or may not have written something similar.

  2. Almost – it is either a paraphrase or missing some words or incorrect words, but usually no one else said it as far as we know.

  3. Not Quite – while Lewis wrote it, the quote when isolated means something other than intended (or has the potential to be misunderstood).

WELCOME!

WELCOME!
Sketch courtesy of Jef Murray

Sketch courtesy of Jef Murray

The purpose of Essential C.S. Lewis is to provide useful information to all types of C.S. Lewis fans. So, whether you are new to the works and writings of C.S. Lewis, or have been reading him for years, you should be able to find something new and/or interesting. Something just begun in 2013 are two new features. Below you will notice Jack in Retrospect and Quote of the Day. The first is a weekly column examining what was going on related to Lewis over the years that week. The quotes shared are from something he wrote (or was published) around the same time or month.  The four remaining elements: C.S. Lewis MinuteAll About Jack PodcastLewis Daily Quiz and Fact of the Day are the same as before (click on the links for details if you need it). Something else new is the ability to keep up with this site via Facebook. Please visit and like!

CSL Daily 7/29

Q7-29

FACT OF THE DAY:

Quam Bene Saturno, Lewis’s first published poem came out in July, 1913 (when he was just 14). It was in Cherbourg School Magazine.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“We must, on pain of idiocy, deny from the very outset the idea that looking at is, by its own nature, intrinsically truer or better than looking along. One must look both along and at everything.”

Meditation in a Toolshed
(Published in The Coventry Evening Telegraph on 7/17/1945)

CSL Daily 7/28

Q7-28

FACT OF THE DAY:

The lighthearted essay “A Dream” was first published on this date (7/28) in 1944 in The Spectator. It’s available in Present Concerns.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“In my waking hours I would never [approve some actions]. But the dreaming mind is regrettably immoral.”

A Dream
(Published in The Spectator on 7/28/1945)

COMPLETE Walter Hooper Interview 2016

Walter Hooper COMPLETEjpgThe following is the complete interview (nearly 60 minutes) with Walter Hooper. It was recording in his home on July 20, 2016. As you likely know, Walter has been the central figure since the death of C.S. Lewis in making sure Lewis’ writing that were published in his life were reprinted and also Hooper has edited the majority of material from Lewis that was previously unpublished. His C.S. Lewis – A Companion and Guide gives the best single volume summary of the works of Lewis and key facts about his life.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Listen to COMPLETE Walter Hooper Interview

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CSL Daily 7/27

Q7-27

FACT OF THE DAY:

The first US edition of The Four Loves was published today (7/27) in 1960.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“We find thus by experience that there is no good applying to Heaven for earthly comfort. Heaven can give heavenly comfort; no other kind.”

The Four Loves
(U.S. edition Published on 7/27/1960)

What the Bird Said Early in the Year – Reading by Dr. Don King

While in Oxford last week I visited the famous Addison’s Walk. It is on the grounds at Magdalen, where Lewis taught for nearly 30 years. I was there attending the Inklings Week that the Inklings Fellowship organized.

Dr. Don King was doing an informal tour of Magdalen and when we arrived at the place where the poem is located, he spontaneously read it. What follows is a video featuring a picture of the poem at Addison’s Walk and the audio of him reading it.

CSL Daily 7/26

Q7-26

FACT OF THE DAY:

The U.S. Paperback editions of Surprised By Joy and Till We Have Faces came out on July 9th ten years apart (1970, 1980).

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

[Screwtape Advises:] “I would make it a rule to eradicate from my patient any strong personal taste which is not actually a sin, even if it is something quite trivial.”

The Screwtape Letters XIII
(Published in The Guardian on 7/25/1941)

CSL Daily 7/25

 Q7-25

FACT OF THE DAY:

On this day  (7/25) in 1941 the 13th letter from Screwtape was published in The Guardian. Wormwood has failed again…second conversion.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

[Screwtape Admits:] “I know that the Enemy [God] also wants to detach men from themselves, but in a different way. Remember always, that he really likes the little vermin, and sets an absurd value on the distinctiveness of every one of them.”

The Screwtape Letters XIII
(Published in The Guardian on 7/25/1941)

CSL Daily 7/24

 Q7-24

FACT OF THE DAY:

All My Road Before Me: The Diary of C. S. Lewis 1922-27 came out in the US today (7/24) in 1991 (three months after its release in the UK). 

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“You can step outside one experience only by stepping inside another. Therefore, if all inside experiences are misleading, we are always misled.”

Meditation in a Toolshed
(Published in The Coventry Evening Telegraph on 7/17/1945)

PREVIEW of Walter Hooper Interview 2016

Walter Hooper PREVIEWThe following podcast is a PREVIEW of my interview with Walter Hooper.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Listen to Walter Hooper PREVIEW Interview

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CSL Daily 7/23

Q7-23

FACT OF THE DAY:

While two dozen poems by Lewis were published in Punch, “Revival or Decay?” is the only non-fiction work published there.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“All sorts of things will make a man brave for the time being. Alcohol, ignorance of the danger, anger, self-respect, human loyalty, and love of God. But they’re not all equally good sources.”

The Anvil
(BBC Radio Broadcast aired 7/22/1943)

CSL Daily 7/22

 Q7-22

FACT OF THE DAY:

Lewis was a guest on “The Anvil” that was aired today (7/22) in 1943. This BBC radio program was recorded on the 19th.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“If you will go to God just as you are, fully admitting that you care about Him very little, and put yourself in His hand, if you’re even ready to be made to care and leave Him to work, He’ll do the rest.”

The Anvil
(BBC Radio Broadcast aired 7/22/1943)

CSL Daily 7/21

 Q7-21

FACT OF THE DAY:

The poem known today as The Magician and the Dryad was first published in Punch on July 20, 1949.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“The feeling of being, or not being, forgiven and loved, is not what matters. One must come down to brass tacks. If there is a particular sin on your conscience, repent and confess it. If there isn’t, tell the despondent devil not to be silly.”

Letter to Mary Willis Shelburne 7/21/1958
(Published in The Collected Letters of C.S. Lewis, Volume III)

CSL Daily 7/20

 Q7-20

FACT OF THE DAY:

Willing Slaves of the Welfare State was published today (7/20) in 1958 in The Observer. It was part of series on Is Progress Possible?

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“Progress, for me, means increasing goodness and happiness of individual lives. For the species, as for each man, mere longevity seems to me a contemptible ideal.”

Willing Slaves of the Welfare State (Published in The Observer on 7/20/1958)

CSL Daily 7/19

Q7-19

FACT OF THE DAY:

On this date in 1943 “The Anvil” (a BBC radio program) recorded its show with Lewis as one of the guests.

– – –

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“The safest road to Hell is the gradual one—the gentle slope, soft underfoot, without sudden turnings, without milestones, without signposts.”

The Screwtape Letters XII
(Published in The Guardian on 7/18/1941)

32nd Screwtape Letter Fragment Discovered

I’m so excited to share a discovery I made that I’m not waiting to publish it later (like some more respected scholars would do). Although I’ll probably released a revised version soon in The Babylon Bee or The Onion.

As the title suggests, I’ve come across a fragment of what appears to be a previously undiscovered letter from Screwtape! I came across the unfinished piece while on an Inklings walk guided by Dr. Hal Poe. Another participant noticed something unusual while we paused between buildings and looked inside only to discover the filming of the Inspector Morse show. I met the actor (his name is not important to this tale) and we struck up a short conversation. Turns out he had on him this questionable written piece and freely gave it to me because he heard of my enhanced study guide called C.S. Lewis Goes to Hell. He assured me that his nephew found it at a secondhand bookshop in the back of a copy of The Screwtape Letters. I told this to Stan Shelley, noted collector and seller of Inklings items and he stormed off rather quickly…I’m sure to locate the bookstore (or it could have been to the toilet, as he had been drinking one of those big 32oz drinks from the local Sheets gas station).

The fragment in question is transcribed below, but I also need to say that I sent pictures of the handwritten piece to Dr. Charlie Starr, the nomad, and handwriting Lewis scholar. His statement to me was that he’d not only stop wearing his signature hat, but eat it, if someone else found it to not be authentic!

Dr. Don King, noted U.S. expert on Lewis’ poetry was upset with the finding because he feared it would overshadow an early poem he discovered the day before written by Lewis when he was just five. (Spoiler Alert) It’s rather short, I don’t know why it would be noteworthy…after all, it only says: “I’m a poet and I know it.”

I waited until about midnight to reveal the news to Dr. Hal Poe and his only comment before abruptly hanging up on me was, “This is embarrassing, next thing you know it will be revealed that Lewis and his wife, Joy were lovers of disco music.”

Without further ado about nothing (to quote Shakespeare, or was it his brother?):

My Dear Wormwood’s Father,

     I write to inform you of your son’s failure as I had already predicted to you. Ever since you married my sister and pushed your child from a previous marriage into the Training College, I warned you nothing good would come of it! But being a good brother I did what I could…I even gave him an easy assignment. As a result I do hope you aren’t seriously considering sending your other son, Snaggletooth through the college. And also… 

I’m afraid that is where the fragment ends. As you can guess, this discovery will surely change the shape of Lewis studies for many decades to come. That’s because others will no doubt visit Oxford and wonder around the streets in search of their random opportunity to find such a great treasure of fool’s gold as I have found.