CSL Daily 7/23/17

FACT OF THE DAY:

While two dozen poems by Lewis were published in Punch, “Revival or Decay?” is the only non-fiction work published there.

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QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“All sorts of things will make a man brave for the time being. Alcohol, ignorance of the danger, anger, self-respect, human loyalty, and love of God. But they’re not all equally good sources.”

The Anvil
(BBC Radio Broadcast aired 7/22/1943)

CSL Daily 7/22/17

FACT OF THE DAY:

Lewis was a guest on “The Anvil” that was aired July 22, 1943. This BBC radio program was recorded on the 19th. His comments were printed in 1981 special edition of Mere Christianity.

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QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“If you will go to God just as you are, fully admitting that you care about Him very little, and put yourself in His hand, if you’re even ready to be made to care and leave Him to work, He’ll do the rest.”

The Anvil
(BBC Radio Broadcast aired 7/22/1943)

CSL Daily 7/19/17

FACT OF THE DAY:

On July 19, 1943 “The Anvil” (a BBC radio program) recorded its show with Lewis as one of the guests.

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QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“The safest road to Hell is the gradual one—the gentle slope, soft underfoot, without sudden turnings, without milestones, without signposts.”

The Screwtape Letters XII
(Published in The Guardian on 7/18/1941)

CSL Daily 7/13/17

FACT OF THE DAY:

Broadcast Talks was first released in the U.K. on July 13, 1942, containing the first two BBC radio series.

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QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“Whenever you find a man who says he does not believe in a real Right and Wrong, you will find the same man going back on this a moment later. He may break his promise to you, but if you try breaking one to him he will be complaining ‘It’s not fair’ before you can say Jack Robinson.”

Broadcast Talks
(Published on 7/13/1942)

(CMCSL-4): After Winston Churchill, Lewis Was the Most Recognized Voice in Britain in the 1940’s

This is part of an occasional series exploring questionable claims about the life or writings of C.S. Lewis.  For a list of the topics either already explored or planned to be examined you can visit the introduction to this series.    


Most people enjoy being recognized. In fact, those who are well-known are usually ones who seek out the fame. This was not the case for C.S. Lewis. While he enjoyed the company of friends and spoke publicly, he was also a rather bookish man. In an interview published in the September 8, 1947 issue of Time he is quoted as saying, “I like monotony.” So, even though Lewis didn’t seek to be famous, he nevertheless became a public figure.

Much of his fame (at least in England) is attributed to the fact that he was on the radio (BBC) speaking in favor of the Christian faith on four series of talks that later became the book Mere Christianity. His third show from the first series had an audience of over two million listeners! Is it any wonder there is the claim that Lewis was the most recognized voice after Winston Churchill? Even though this detail has been mentioned by established scholars, it is simply not true.